Fish Info

Gurnard 


Scientific Name: Chelidonichthys kumu

Length: 20–30 cm, reaching 50 cm 
Weight: 0.5–1.4 kg, up to 2 kg
Availability: Year round

Location
Gurnard are widespread around New Zealand and are found on sandy shell sea beds to a depth of about 180 metres. Small juveniles prefer shallow waters and are therefore often caught in shallow harbours.

Spawning
Spawning extends through the spring and summer, occurring earlier in the north than the south. The egg and larval development occurs in surface waters with Juveniles growing rapidly, some are mature at two years and most by four. Females grow faster and are often larger than the males. Spawning grounds are thought to be widespread. 

Growth
Red Gurnard live to about 16 years and reach sexual maturity at two-three years of age when they are around 23 cm (from the nose to the fork in the tail). At that time their growth rate slows and they gradually reach a maximum length of around 42 cm.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 

 


 

NZ Sole 

Scientific Name: Pelotretis Flavilatus
Length: 25–35 cm, reaching 40 cm
Weight: less than 0.8 kg
Availability: Year-round. 

Location
Sole are widespread in New Zealand waters, particularly in the south, from near the shore to 100 metres depth, found to depths of 385 m. 

Spawning
Sole spawn from July to September, usually in shallow bays where they congregate, and the young fish settle to the bottom.

Growth
Juveniles gather in sheltered inshore waters, such as estuarine areas, shallow mudflats and sand flats, where they remain for up to two years, adults reach full size in about five years.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Rig 

Scientific Name: Mustelus Lenticulatus
Length: 70–100 cm, reaching 140 cm
Weight: 3–4 kg
Availability: Year-round. 

Location
Rig is found around New Zealand, usually in water no more than 200 metres deep. In spring and summer, they congregate in large numbers in broad shallow bays. In autumn, they migrate to the outer shelf. Most Rig make extensive coastal migrations. The females appear to travel the greatest distance-often up to 200 kilometres.

Spawning
Adult female Rig migrate into shallow coastal waters in spring–summer to give birth to live young following a 10 to 11 month gestation period and then mate with males before departing for deeper waters. 

Growth
Their young are born in litters of 10 to 20 pups measuring 30 centimetres. The new-born juveniles remain in the nurseries for about six months, where they presumably benefit from rich food resources and a refuge from predators before disappearing into deeper waters when the temperatures drop in autumn. Their growth rate is relatively rapid, Rig reach maturity at four to five years.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year.


 

Snapper

Scientific Name: Pagrus Auratus 
Length: 30–50 cm, reaching 100 cm
Weight: 1–2.5 kg, up to 19 kg
Availability: Year round, more abundant from October to April

Location
Snapper are most common around the North Island and upper South Island, especially in Tasman Bay and Golden Bay. Snapper have a wide variety of habitats, including reefs as well as sand and mud bottoms feeding on shellfish and other crustaceans. Adults are uncommon at depths of more than 100 metres, while Juveniles tend to range over large areas in shallow, sheltered habitats from five to 50 metres deep but move offshore in winter, this movement continues throughout their life. 

Spawning
Snapper congregate inshore before spawning between November-December and travel together to spawning grounds in the spring, Snapper may not spawn if water temperatures are too low.
Snapper has high fecundity that increases with age, a 3 year old fish may produce 250,000 eggs while a 10 year old fish may release 5 million eggs. Snapper are 'serial spawners, releasing many batches of eggs during the spring and summer. 

Growth
Snapper reach sexual maturity by 4-5 years of age and are slow-growing, long-lived (up to 60 years), and migratory. An average schooling snapper can be anything from 4 to 10 years old with larger snapper around 5 kg or more, from 20 to 60 years old. Once sexual maturity is reached, about half of the female snapper are believed to change sex. 

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.


Groper

Scientific Name: Polyprion Oxygeneios

Length: 80–100 cm, reaching 150 cm
Weight: 6 kg average, up to 20 kg
Availability: October to May

Location
Groper (more commonly named in the South Island) - Hapuku are caught around New Zealand most commonly over or near rocky areas to depths of 250 metres. In particular, they are caught off the East Coast of the North Island, in Cook Strait, off Kaikoura, and the West Coast of the South Island. Some inhabit reefs a few metres below the surface, others live at depths of up to 400 metres. Hapuku rarely swim alone and are sometimes found in schools of 30 or more. They migrate but are believed to return to the same caves and rocky clefts for the winter spawning season.

Spawning
Spawning occurs during the winter, often earlier in the north, but the actual spawning grounds are not known. Juveniles are thought to be pelagic associating with flotsam and floating vegetation in open water, switching to demersal at about 50 cm total length. It is thought that after spawning they may then return to the same location. 

Growth
Hapuku are thought to be slow growing and can live to be at least 60 years old. The relative of the Hapuku, Bass (Polyprion americanus) can grow as large as 80 kg and lengths of 5 feet whereas Hapuku tend to grow to 20 kg and are more common.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Ling

Scientific Name: Genypterus Blacodes

Length: 80-120 cm     
Weight: 4-10 kg, up to 20 kg 
Availability: Year round
    
Location
Ling are a bottom dwelling species of the eel family and found between depths of 20 m to 1000 m however are more widespread and common in 200-800 m around the southern North Island and South Island, they may at times be caught well above the bottom, for example when feeding on Hoki during the Hoki spawning season. 

Spawning
Spawning is July to September in the South Island and occurs mainly in depths from 300 to 600 m, however the time of year will vary between locations. Little is known about the reproductive cycle, it is determined that this species is a batch spawner, with low fecundity and a high spawning frequency. Ling are Oviparous (meaning that ling lay eggs), with oval pelagic eggs that float in a gelatinous mass.

Growth
Little is known about the distribution of juvenile ling until they are about 40 cm long when they begin to appear over most of the adult range and around shallower shelf waters. Females grow significantly faster and reach a greater size than males; however growth rates are different between areas. . Ling live to a maximum age of about 30 years

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


John Dory

Scientific Name: Zeus Faber
Length: 30–40 cm reaching 65 cm
Weight: 0.8–1.5 kg, up to 3.5 kg
Availability: Year round

Location
They are solitary fish that have a range of habitats, from reefs to sand and mud bottoms ranging in depths from 5 metres to 360 metres. John Dory are usually found in the warm waters around the North Island of New Zealand, most commonly north of the Bay of Plenty but not uncommon to the top of the South Island.

Spawning
They spawn in summer. Juveniles have similar colour and form to adults. After they are 3 or 4 years of age they are usually ready to reproduce. John Dory are substrate scatterers, which mean that they release sperm and eggs into the water to fertilize. Typical lifespan is about 12 years in the wild

Growth
They grow rapidly, reaching maturity in three to four years with a typical lifespan of about 12 years in the wild, with females usually being larger than the males, occasionally reaching sizes in excess of half a metre in length

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.


Kahawhai

Scientific Name: Arripis Trutta, A. Xlabion
Length: 40–55 cm, reaching 75 cm
Weight: 2–3 kg, up to 5 kg
Availability: Year-round. 

Location
Kahawai are found around the New Zealand coast and are often sighted close to shore, frequently schooling by size, with juveniles found in shallow coastal waters and adults in open water, often in large schools. Kahawai are migratory along the coast from the far North to the Deep South, down to a depth of around 30 metres. During the winter months Kahawai are found more commonly in the deeper water further offshore 

Spawning
Kahawai spawn on the seabed, 60 to 100 metres deep. The eggs are pelagic. Juvenile fish under a year old can be found in shallow. 
Kahawai spawn in the summer months in the warmer shallow waters between March and April. They move into shallow waters in huge schools. In late summer the small eggs 1 mm in size are found in the shallow water and hatch within two days of fertilisation. 

Growth
Average size of adults is 40 - 50 cm, reaching 75 cm; the maximum-recorded age of kahawai is 26 years. Kahawai smaller than 100 mm will eat mainly copepods, while adults typically feed on fishes but also on pelagic crustaceans, especially krill, although Kahawai are principally pelagic feeders, they will take food from the seabed.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


Tarakihi

Scientific Name: Nemadactylus Macropterus
Length: 30–40 cm, reaching 60 cm
Weight: 0.9–2.5 kg, up to 6 kg
Availability: Year round, more abundant from October to April

Location
Tarakihi are a long-lived relative of Red Moki, they are most abundant south of East Cape, around Cook Strait, and on the east and west coasts of the South Island, found on weed lines usually in smaller schools. They are pelagic as post larvae, bottom dwelling around reefs as juveniles, and school over the open bottom as adults at depths of 100 to 250 metres. In winter, they are found at depths of 50 to 100 metres.

Spawning
Spawning takes place in late summer and autumn, it is believed that Tarakihi remain in a larval form for between 7-12 months and it’s likely that ocean currents disperse larvae around New Zealand.

Growth
Tarakihi can live for more than 40 years and are relatively slow growing. Sexual maturity is reached at 4-6 years (25-35 cm from the nose to the fork of the tail) after which their growth rate slows

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


Barracouta

Scientific Name: Thyrsites Atun 

Length: 60-100 cm up to 140 cm    
Weight: 1.5-3 kg up to 6 kg
Availability: Year round

Location
Widespread in New Zealand coastal waters, abundant in some localities, with main grounds around the South Island, they also occur in our northern waters, ranging from shallow inshore areas to depths of 200 m, adult fish have been found out to about 400 m depth.

Spawning
Barracouta spawn mainly in late-winter/spring (August–September) on the East and West Coasts of both of the main islands, and in late spring (November–December) in Southland and the Chatham Islands, moving considerable distances to spawn. Barracouta feed intensively during February and March. 

Growth
Barracouta can grow to 1.4 m and are relatively short lived to about 10 years. Sexual maturity is reached at about 50–60 cm around 2–3 years of age.  Juveniles, which grow rapidly, congregate in sheltered waters such as the Hauraki Gulf, Tasman Bay, and the Canterbury Bight.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Blue Cod

Scientific Name: Parapercis colias 

Length: 30–40 cm, reaching 60 cm
Weight: 0.8–1.5 kg, up to 3 kg
Availability: Year round, more abundant from April to September

Location
Blue Cod are bottom dwellers, found throughout New Zealand at depths of up to 150 metres and are more abundant the further south you go. 

Spawning
Spawning takes place in the late winter and spring. Young fish return to the shallow reefs in the summer and grow rapidly in the first year. Eggs that are produced float around in the open sea for around 5 days, then hatch, the larvae stay in the open sea for 5 more days before settling on the sea bed. Once hatched, Juveniles migrate from shelf waters to shallow areas inshore where they mature, males growing faster and larger than females. 
Blue cod are hermaphrodites (they have both male and female sexual organs) and start off as females before some change to males.

Growth 
Sexual maturity is reached at different lengths and ages depending on their location. Northland blue cod reach sexual maturity at 2 years when they are 10-19 cm long, Marlborough Sounds blue cod at 3-6 years when they are 21-26 cm long, and Southland blue cod at 4-5 years when they are 26-28 cm long and can live to 17 years.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year.


King Salmon

Scientific Name: Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha

Length: 40–100 cm
Weight: 7–10 kg
Availability: Year-round. 

Location
The Chinook salmon known in New Zealand as Quinnat, King or Spring Salmon is one of five species of Pacific salmon. It is New Zealand’s largest freshwater fish and the largest species in the salmon family. The breed was introduced into New Zealand Rivers on the South Island’s east coast in Canterbury and Otago more than 100 years ago. These Salmon have thrived since being introduced into New Zealand waters. Established spawning runs are found in the Rangitata, Opihi, Ashburton, Rakaia, Waimakariri, Hurunui and Waiau rivers.

Spawning
Spawning takes place in autumn and winter. The young fish then spend three months in fresh water before migrating to the sea as smolts. They live there for two to four years. The maturing adults return to the river of their birth, spawn and then die and in the spring the eggs hatch.

Growth
New Zealand chinook do not grow as big as the North American chinook, which commonly weigh in at 20 kg in Alaska, but a 4 year old New Zealand caught chinook is more likely to average 7 kg.
The difference in size is largely attributed to the fact that Alaskan Salmon spend more years at sea, whereas New Zealand Chinook salmon return at three to four years of age.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Jack Mackeral

Scientific Name: Tracherus Declivis, T. Novaezelandiae, T. Murphyi

Length: 15–45 cm
Weight: 0.2–0.8 kg, up to 1.5 kg
Availability: Year-round. 

Location
Jack mackerel are also known as Greenback Horse Mackerel (Tracherus declivis), Yellowtail Horse Mackerel (T. novaezelandiae) and slender Jack Mackerel (T. murphyi). They school in mid water, ranging from bays to oceanic islands between Cape Rēinga and Foveaux Strait, and around the Chatham Islands.

Spawning
Mackerel are prolific broadcast spawners, individual females lay between 300,000 and 1,500,000 eggs. Their eggs and larvae are pelagic, meaning they float free in the open sea. Some stocks migrate in large schools along the coast to suitable spawning grounds during the summer months, where they spawn in fairly shallow waters. After spawning they return the way they came, in smaller schools, to suitable feeding grounds, from there they may move offshore into deeper waters and spend the winter.

Growth
They eat plankton and prey on small pelagic fish. They typically grow fairly quickly to around 50 centimetres and may live to 28 years.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 

 


 

Red Cod

Scientific Name: Pseudophycis Bachus, P. Barbata, P. Breviuscula
Length: 40–70 cm
Weight: 0.8–1.3 kg, up to 2.0 kg
Availability: July to January
    
Location
Red Cod are found throughout New Zealand seas, more commonly in southern waters at depths of 100 to 300 metres, however Red Cod are an active wandering fish with a range which extends from the shore into depths of over 750 metres. Usually found in schools, they migrate from the outer continental shelf to shallow coastal grounds.

Spawning
Spawning in red cod varies with latitude, with spawning occurring later at higher latitudes. In the Canterbury Bight, spawning occurs from August to October. Juvenile red cod are found in offshore waters after the spawning period.

Growth
Red cod are fast-growing but short-lived (few older than six years), Cod grow to about 25 cm total length in the first year, followed by annual growth increments of around 15, 10 and 5 cm. Growth of both sexes is similar for the first two years, after which females tend to grow faster than males and reach a larger overall length. By the time they reach sexual maturity at four years they measure 50 cm long. Large mature females may produce a staggering 30 million eggs in a single breeding season.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Sea Perch

Scientific Name: Helicolenus Percoides

Length: 25-35 cm reaching 60 cm
Weight: 400-650 gm
Availability: Year round
    
Location
Sea Perch occur all around New Zealand, possibly more common in the south. They can be found in waters from the shoreline out to depths of 1200 m, but are most common at depths of 150-500 m, the different colourations between Perch species may be attributed to deeper water species. Sea Perch are opportunistic feeders on sea floor animals. Helicolenus percoides is reddish-orange with brown and yellow dorsal patterns; Helicolenus barathri is redder in colour

Spawning
It is unknown when the mating season occurs as males become fertile first, fertilise the females, and there may be a delay before the females begin enlarging as the fertilisation develop into eyed larvae.

Growth
Sea Perch have a maximum age of 32-43 years depending on region. Maturity is reached at 19-25 cm in length and 5-7 years in males, and 15-20 cm length and 5 years for females with males growing relatively faster than females.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

Blue Warehou

Scientific Name: Seriolella Brama

Length: 40–60 cm reaching up to 90 cm
Weight: 1–3 kg, up to 7 kg
Availability: July to January
    
Location
Blue Warehou are found closer to shore than other Warehou species. They are common in cooler waters off the South Island, at depths of 20 to 200 metres, and in Cook Strait. Blue Warehou are migratory, and there can be variations in appearance at different locations. They are planktonic feeders.

Spawning
Spawning occurs at different times in different regions around New Zealand varying from August through to May.  Off the West Coast of the South Island (August to September), Kaikoura (March to May), Southland (November), and Hawkes Bay (September). Sexual maturity is reached around 4-5 years.

Growth
Blue warehou grow rapidly and live for about 10 years with a maximum age of 22 years. The species is distinguished from other Warehou by colour and fin characteristics while juveniles have additional spots.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 

 


Giant Stargazer / Monk Fish

Scientific Name: Kathetostoma Giganteum
Length: 30–50 cm, reaching 90 cm
Weight: 1.5–5 kg, up to 9 kg
Availability: May to August
    
Location
Monkfish live in New Zealand coastal waters and more common around the southern part of the South Island at depths between 60 metres and 600 metres off the continental shelf. Six species of stargazer occur in New Zealand but only the monkfish is commercially important. They partially bury themselves in soft sediment on the sea bed and prey on passing fish and crustaceans

Spawning
Monkfish reach maturity between ages 3 and 4, and spawning can take place from February through October. Females release large egg veils that can contain over 1 million eggs; these are a non-adhesive, buoyant gelatinous egg mass that floats as a broad raft on the water's surface. Larvae and juveniles are pelagic and remain in this stage for several months before they settle to the bottom at a size of about 3 inches mostly eating small fish, shrimp, and squid.

Growth
Monkfish grow rapidly with females reaching as large as 70-90 cm and living to 12 years of age. Males have not been found older than age 9, and their total lengths can reach up to approximately 60 cm in length with an average of 30 – 50 cm

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 

 


 

Yellowbelly Flounder

Scientific Name: Rhombosolea: R. Leporina: 

R. Tapirina: R. Retiaria
Length: 25–45 cm
Weight: 0.2–0.6 kg
Availability: Year round, particularly in the 
Manukau and Kaipara Harbours
    
Location
Occurs around New Zealand only, the Yellowbelly Flounder are a shallow-water fish found at depths of up to 50 metres. In New Zealand, they are most abundant in harbours, estuaries, and muddy bays, particularly in the north. The related and similar greenback Flounder occurs around Southern New Zealand down to 100 m.

Spawning
Sexual maturity is around the age of 2, for females fecundity is at a length >25 cm and males at 22 cm. Spawning of this species takes place offshore, ovary development can be divided into five stages; immature / resting, ripening, ripe, running, and spent. Peak spawning season are from winter to spring. 

Growth
The Yellow belly Flounder has a short life span of about four years; this species spends most of its life in shallow water and starts tidal migration from about 1 year old. Juveniles gather in sheltered inshore waters, such as estuarine areas, shallow mudflats and sandflats, where they remain for up to two years with female Flounder growing larger than males, average size 25-40 cm.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 

 


Brill

Scientific Name: Colistium Guntheri
Length: 25–40 cm reaching 90 cm
Weight: 1.8 kg
Availability: April until August
    
Location
Brill are a demersal fish native to shallow seas around New Zealand more common in the South, at depths between 27 metres and 49 metres up to depths of 100 m.

Spawning
Spawning for Brill is from April until August and can produce as many as 5 – 10 million eggs, these have multiple oil droplets that make them rise to the surface where the water is warmer. It takes about two weeks to hatch, depending on the water temperature. Newly hatched Brill averaged 2.1 mm with first feeding about 4 days post hatch. 

Growth
Most young turbot larvae will spend about a year swimming in an upright position, eating mostly plankton, juveniles gather in sheltered inshore waters, such as estuarine areas, shallow mudflats and sandflats. It will take a further year for a male to mature, and two years for a female to mature. 
Brill grow rapidly for the first three years of life before growth slows, with females growing faster and larger than males. Growth is minimal in fish older than five years. Brill can live to 25 years and grow on average between 40 cm to 60 cm in length and weigh up 3 kg.

Where to buy
Many supermarkets supply fish because of buyer demand, this doesn’t always mean they are making money; in fact some sell at a loss. Always check the deals on individual species, it’s a bit like selling coke for .99 c, it gets you in the door.
Many large processing companies now sell direct to the public, look in the yellow pages for processing companies and give them a ring but know your prices as they are selling retail and you can still get caught out. Frozen products from large companies are as good as fresh with snap freezing at high temperatures and will keep for longer in your home freezer because of the quick processing and freezing already taken care of.

Best time to buy
Spawning season is when fish are at their highest volume and most accessible.
As fish prices are dictated by availability, this is the best time to buy individual species for the exception of farmed Salmon. Follow the seasons and buy at the right time and save up to 50% just from the time of year. 


 

School Shark

Scientific Name: Galeorhinus Galeus
Length: 140 – 180 cm90 cm 
Weight: 5-15 kg
Availability: Year round
    
Location
School Shark have a widespread distribution worldwide and are found mainly near the seabed around coasts in temperate waters, in New Zealand School Shark are more common in the north; typically a species of the shallower waters of the continental shelf and the open ocean, but known to at least 200 m up to 800 m.

Spawning
Mating is believed to occur in deep water around winter before the releasing of pups during spring and early summer (November-January). Females have a low fecundity and data suggests that females have a 3 year cycle making these shark slow breeders.  
School Shark is ovoviviparous, this means that the eggs are fertilised internally and are retained within the mother's body until they are ready to hatch. The gestation period is about one year and the number of developing pups carried varies with the size of the mother, averaging somewhere between about 28 and 38, this differs between countries. The females have traditional pupping areas in sheltered bays and estuaries where the young are born at about 30 to 40 cm long

Growth
This species matures late and is slow growing with males maturing at a length of about 135 cm (8 years) mating around 9 years and females at about 150 cm (12 years) and give birth at about